Exchange ActiveSync iOS and Android User Agent Strings

by Ed Sparks

Updated: July 2019

iOS devices unfortunately do not register with ActiveSync or other tools with a logical clear human readable version number. Instead, they show up with strings like "Apple-iPhone3C1/902.206"  

Obviously, this makes discovery and reporting difficult.  To help ourselves, and the community at large, we now maintain this list of hardware and iOS versions for Apple gear.

Hardware Versions:

iPod2C1 = iPod Touch 2
iPod3C1 = iPod Touch 3
iPod4C1 = iPod Touch 4
iPod5C1 = iPod Touch 5

iPad1C1 = iPad 
iPad2C1 = iPad 2 WIFI 
iPad2C2 = iPad 2 WIFI + 3G 
iPad2C3 = iPad 2 WIFI + 3G CDMA 
iPad2C4 = iPad Mini - WIFI 
iPad2C5 = iPad Mini - WIFI + LTE
iPad3C1 = The New iPad (iPad 3)- WIFI
iPad3C2 = The New iPad (iPad 3) - WIFI + LTE 
iPad3C3 = iPad with Retina Display (iPad 4) - WIFI 
iPad3C4 = iPad with Retina Display (iPad 4) - WIFI + LTE  
iPad4C1 = iPad Air - WIFI 
iPad4C2 = iPad Air - WIFI + LTE 
iPad4C4 = iPad Mini with Retina Display - WIFI
iPad4C5 = iPad Mini with Retina Display - WIFI + LTE
iPad5C1 = iPad Mini 4 - WIFI
iPad5C2 = iPad Mini 4 - WIFI + LTE
iPad5C3 - iPad Air 2 - WIFI
iPad5C4 = iPad Air 2 = WIFI + LTE
iPad6C3 = iPad Pro (9.7") - WIFI
iPad6C4 = iPad Pro (9.7") - WIFI + LTE
iPad6C7 = iPad Pro (12.9") - WIFI
iPad6C8 = iPad Pro (12.9") - WIFI + LTE
iPad6C12 = iPad (9.7") 2017 - WIFI
iPad7C1 = iPad Pro (12.9") WIFI 2nd Gen
iPad7C2 = iPad Pro (12.9") WIFI + LTE 2nd Gen
iPad7C3 = iPad Pro (10.5") WIFI 2nd Gen
iPad7C4 = iPad Pro (10.5") WIFI + LTE 2nd Gen

iPhone1C2 = iPhone 3G 
iPhone2C1 = iPhone 3GS
iPhone3C1 = iPhone 4 GSM
iPhone3C2 = iPhone4 GSM
iPhone3C3 = iPhone 4 CDMA
iPhone4C1 = iPhone 4S
iPhone5C1 = iPhone 5 GSM/LTE
iPhone5C2 = iPhone 5 CDMA USA/China 
iPhone5C3 = iPhone 5C GSM/CDMA/Americas
iPhone5C4 = iPhone 5C Europe/Asia
iPhone6C1 = iPhone 5S GSM/CDMA/Americas
iPhone6C2 = iPhone 5S Europe/Asia
iPhone7C1 = iPhone 6 Plus
iPhone7C2 = iPhone 6
iPhone8C1 = iPhone 6S
iPhone8C2 = iPhone 6S Plus
iPhone8C4 = iPhone SE
iPhone9C1 = iPhone 7
iPhone9C2 = iPhone 7 Plus
iPhone9C3 = iPhone 7
iPhone9C4 = iPhone 7 Plus  
iPhone10C1 = iPhone 8
iPhone10C2 = iPhone 8 Plus 
iPhone10C3 = iPhone X 
iPhone10C4 = iPhone 8 
iPhone10C5 = iPhone 8 Plus 
iPhone10C6 = iPhone X
iPhone11C2 = iPhone XS
iPhone11C6 = iPhone XS Max
iphone11C8 = iPhone XR

iPhone OS Versions:

508.11 = 2.2.1
701.341 = 3.0
701.400 = 3.0.1 
703.144 = 3.1 
704.11 = 3.1.2 
705.18 = 3.1.3  
702.367 = 3.2 (original iPad only) 
702.405 = 3.2.1 (original iPad only) 
702.500 = 3.2.2 (original iPad only) 

From this point forward, iPhone OS was renamed iOS.

iOS Versions:

801.293 = 4.0
801.306 = 4.0.1
801.400 = 4.0.2
802.117 = 4.1
802.118 = 4.1 
803.148 = 4.2.1 
803.14800001 = 4.2.1 
805.128 = 4.2.5 
805.200 = 4.2.6 
805.303 = 4.2.7 
805.401 = 4.2.8 
805.501 = 4.2.9 
805.600 = 4.2.10 
806.190 = 4.3 
806.191 = 4.3 
807.4 = 4.3.1 
808.7 = 4.3.2 
808.8 = 4.3.2 
810.2 = 4.3.3 
810.3 = 4.3.3 
811.2 = 4.3.4 
812.1 = 4.3.5
901.334 = 5.0 
901.40x = 5.0.1 
902.17x = 5.1 
902.206 = 5.1.1 
1001.40x = 6.0 
1001.52x = 6.0.1
1002.14x= 6.1 
1002.146 = 6.1.2 
1002.329 = 6.1.3 
1002.350 = 6.1.3  
1101.465 = 7.0 
1101.470=7.0.1 
1101.47000001=7.0.1 
1101.501=7.0.2 
1102.511 = 7.0.3 
1102.55400001 = 7.0.4 
1102.601 = 7.0.5 
1102.651 = 7.0.6 
1104.167 = 7.1 
1104.169 = 7.1 
1104.201 = 7.1.1 
1104.257 = 7.1.2 
1201.365 = 8.0 
1201.366 = 8.0.1 
1201.405 = 8.0.2 
1202.410/411 = 8.1 
1202.435/436 = 8.1.1 
1202.440/445 = 8.1.2 
1202.466 = 8.1.3 
1204.508 = 8.2 
1206.69 = 8.3 
1208.143 = 8.4 
1208.321 = 8.4.1  
1301.4xxxxxx = 9.0 betas 
1301.342 = 9.0 (older devices) 
1301.344 = 9.0 
1301.402 = 9.0.1 (older devices) 
1301.404 = 9.0.1 
1301.452 = 9.0.2 
1302.143 = 9.1 
1303.075 = 9.2 
1304.15= 9.2.1 
1305.5234xxxx = 9.3 betas 
1305.234 = 9.3 
1305.328 = 9.3.1 
1306.69 = 9.3.2 
1306.72 = 9.3.2 (iPad Pro only) 
1307.34 = 9.3.3 
1307.35 = 9.3.4 
1307.36 = 9.3.5 (important security fix)
1305.5xxx = 10.0 betas 
1401.403 = 10.0.1 
1401.456 = 10.0.2 
1402.72 = 10.1 
1402.100 = 10.1.1 
1403.92 = 10.2 
1404.27 = 10.2.1 
1405.277 = 10.3 
1405.304 = 10.3.1 
1406.89 = 10.3.2 
1406.8089 = 10.3.2 (iPad Pro) 
1407.60 = 10.3.3  
1501.5xxx = 11.0 betas 
1501.372 = 11.0 
1501.402 = 11.0.1 
1501.421 = 11.0.2  
1501.432 = 11.0.3 
1502.5xx = 11.1 betas
1502.93 = 11.1 
1502.150 = 11.1.1 
1502.202 = 11.1.2 
1503.5xx = 11.2 betas 
1503.114 = 11.2 
1503.153 = 11.2.1 
1503.202 = 11.2.2 
1504.60 = 11.2.5 
1504.100 = 11.2.6 
1505.216 = 11.3 
1505.302 = 11.3.1  
1506.79 = 11.4 
1507.77 = 11.4.1
1601.5xx = 12.0 betas
1601.366 = 12.0 
1601.405 = 12.0.1
1602.5xx = 12.1 betas
1602.92 = 12.1
1603.50 = 12.1.1
1604.39 = 12.1.3 
1604.57 = 12.1.4
1605.5xx = 12.2 betas
1605.227 = 12.2 
1606.5xx = 12.3 betas
1606.156 = 12.3
1606.203 = 12.3.1 (current)
1607.5xx = 12.4 betas
1701.55x = 13.0 betas

We've also had requests for some Android agents - particularly Samsung - which are proving equally as annoying to decipher.

Samsung encodes the Android OS version number at the end of their string, with zero padding.

SAMSUNG-SGH-I337M/101.403 indicates Android 4.3 
SAMSUNG-SGH-I317M/100.40102 indicates Android 4.1.2 etc.

So with that knowledge, now what?

Thankfully Ben over at One Simple Script has created a great new version of his reporting script that will parse the IIS ActiveSync logs and report all the versions in use on a server.

Get the script and more information here.

Living Microsoft in an iPhone World

by Ed Sparks

With the continued struggle of Windows Phone to get any kind of market traction, despite finally being mostly on par functionality wise, most of us in the Microsoft world have switched to using iOS or Android mobile hardware.

Surprisingly, these days, it's actually quite an easy coexistence.

Paul Thurrott recently discussed this very topic in an excellent blog post we recommend

Microsoft + iPhone

What surprised most about this article is just how many applications Microsoft makes for iOS. Well worth a read.

Apple iOS Devices can no longer access .local domain over VPN

by Ed Sparks

Apple's software quality slide continues with this recent bug that has existed in all versions of iOS 8, and is thus far unacknowledged. This appears to be related to the rewrite of much of the network stack in current versions of iOS and OS X.   

While this previously worked in older versions of iOS (up to and including iOS 7), starting with recent versions if a VPN connection is established into  a corporate LAN - and that LAN uses the (very common) .local domain for their internal DNS - name resolution will completely fail. Thus, iPhones and iPads can no longer access any of the sites or applications that rely on the internal name resolution. It appears that this is purely a code bug that causes the DNS resolver on iOS to completely ignore the recursive responses for .local requests.

An extensive thread on Apple's support forums discusses this issue, with the usual crickets response from Cupertino.

The workaround that we've successfully implemented on several of our customer sites is to add a dummy DNS zone specifically for the "local" root zone.

For example, if the internal DNS (AD) name is myclient.local, an existing forward lookup zone will be in place for myclient.local. In order for resolution to now work correctly for iOS, add in a forward lookup zone for local. You can accept all the defaults when creating, and in most cases it will be AD integrated. Then, below this new zone, add a domain (subdomain) for myclient. It is worthwhile to add in name server records into this new zone, and in some cases (depending on the internal application) it may be necessary to add host or cname records under the new zone/domain as well.

As usual, let's hope Apple eventually gets around to fixing this one.

GDR3 vs KitKat - A Tale of Two Updates

by Ed Sparks

There's hope for Windows Phone.

A tiny hope, at least. 

We've recently been testing a couple of Windows Phones including the HTC 8X, and the surprising little $99 wonder called the Nokia Lumia 520.

While initial impressions were a mixed bag, the recent update to what Microsoft ridiculously calls "GDR3" has brought a new lease on life to the device.  Incidentally, when WHEN will this company fire their naming strategy people?

GDR3 improves the multitasking substantially by making it much clearer how to kills apps, and updating the still overly-complex and confusing "back stack" to be more consistent with other platforms.  Even more impressively, it dramatically speeds up the OS's performance.  Coupled with the arrival of, or big updates to, a number of necessary big-name apps like Instagram, Facebook, etc. it's an incredibly capable device that works exceptionally well for user's in a Microsoft environment.  Again - this was bought and paid for with NO contract - for under $99!

It's definitely worth checking out, and a great stepping stone to the flagship Lumia models.   

Windows Phone has been somewhat of a behind-the-times also-ran since it's inception, but with these recent updates, and finally a decent app story, 2014 could very well prove to be the year it solidly comes into it's own.  The "Threshold" release of Windows and Windows Phone is next.  Fingers crossed.

 

On the flip side, the recent Android update to 4.4 (Kit Kat) has proven nothing short of train wreck across multiple devices.  Google's outward hostility to Microsoft and their users showed up again with a completely broken ActiveSync client, and the entire OS - despite promising even more 'buttery smooth' UI - seems laggy, slow and buggy.

The gains Android has made against iOS in fit and finish and apps has been nothing short of incredible, but the recent leaps by iOS 7 and Windows Phone show this race is far from over, and Google's definitely getting a bit high on it's perch.  I'd say the personnel changes taking place on the Android team, including the loss of the founder, are showing. 

There are cracks in the Android juggernaut yet.

Apple - Please figure out Calendaring. Everyone else, update to 6.1.2

by Ed Sparks

It's becoming almost a ridiculous sad joke.  Each new iOS release seems to bring a new round of calendaring bugs that cause havoc with Exchange and Activesync, and create no end of headaches for users and admins.

The latest example - the iOS 6.1, 6.1.1 fiasco - has taken it to a new extreme.

Apple needs to stop dripping with hubris about this stuff, and actually test their products consistently and properly.  The post-Steve Jobs downward trend is sad, and concerning.  One product after another is increasingly flawed.

Anyway </rant mode>

In the mean time - read about the iOS 6.1 mess here, then immediately go and update all your i-Devices to 6.1.2.  Then wait for 6.1.3 or 6.2 or whatever is going to fix the lock screen bug.  

Rapid growth in transaction logs, CPU use, and memory consumption in Exchange Server 2010 when a user syncs a mailbox by using an iOS 6.1 or 6.1.1-based device

iOS 6.1: Excess Exchange activity after accepting an exception to recurring calendar event

An Open Letter to Tim Cook

iPhone lockscreen can be bypassed with new iOS 6.1 trick